Colloquium – Prof. Ben Jones – April 11th- 16.00 – MF D565

Colloquium – Prof. Ben Jones – April 11th- 16.00 – MF D565
Apr
11

iBBA colloquium – Thursday April 11th 16:00 MF-D565
Prof. Ben Jones
Neuroscience and Psychology University of Glasgow

 

Improving face perception research through strong science initiatives

Many different disciplines have recently discovered that false positive
rates in the published literature are considerably higher than had previously been thought. In
other words, at least some of the findings that our science is built on are not robust. Initiatives
such as team science (e.g. the Psychological Science Accelerator), open data, open materials,
open analysis code, and registered reports can improve our work by variously
increasing power and generalisability, improving computational reproducibility, and
neutralising publication bias. My talk will highlight two distinct streams of our lab’s work that
have utilised these initiatives in an effort to resolve longstanding debates in the
face perception literature.

The first research stream examines hormonal regulation of face preferences (Jones et al.,
2019 Trends in Cognitive Sciences; Jones et al., 2018 Psychological Science). The
second research stream examines the universality of cognitive models of social
judgments of faces (Jones et al., Accepted In Principle, Nature Human Behavior Registered
Report). Many different disciplines have recently discovered that false positive rates in the
published literature are considerably higher than had previously been thought. In other words, at
least some of the findings that our science is built on are not robust. Initiatives
such as team science (e.g. the Psychological Science Accelerator), open
data, open materials, open analysis code, and registered reports can improve our work by
variously increasing power and generalisability, improving computational
reproducibility, and neutralising publication bias. My talk will highlight two distinct streams of
our lab’s work that have utilised these initiatives in an effort to resolve longstanding debates in
the face perception literature. The first research stream examines hormonal
regulation of face preferences (Jones et al., 2019 Trends in Cognitive Sciences; Jones et
al., 2018 Psychological Science). The second research stream examines the
universality of cognitive models of social judgments of faces (Jones et al.,
Accepted In Principle, Nature Human Behavior Registered Report).

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